16 November 2019 Posted By : Zoey Sky

Add miso to your slaw for a gut-healthy (and delicious) snack

(Natural News) Coleslaw is a common side dish that’s often made with cabbage and mayonnaise. If you’re looking for a healthier version of coleslaw, why not try this gut-friendly, refreshing version made with Brussels sprouts and miso?

Why use Brussels sprouts instead of cabbage?

Brussels sprouts are also a cruciferous vegetable, closely related to cauliflower and kale. They look like mini cabbages and are often cut, cleaned, and cooked to make a nutrient-rich side dish or main course.

Brussels sprouts are low-calorie and rich in fiber. Half a cup (78 g) of Brussels sprouts contains the following vitamins and minerals:

  • 28 calories
  • Protein (2 g)
  • Fiber (2 g)
  • Carbs (6 g)
  • Vitamin K 137 percent of the (Reference Daily Intake) RDI
  • Vitamin C 81 percent of the RDI
  • Vitamin A 12 percent of the RDI
  • Folate 12 percent of the RDI
  • Manganese 9 percent of the RDI

Brussels sprouts are a great source of vitamin K, which is essential for blood clotting and bone health.

They are also full of vitamin C. This antioxidant is needed for iron absorption, tissue repair and immune function.

The dietary fiber in Brussels sprouts supports regularity and gut health. These veggies also contain trace amounts of essential nutrients like iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, thiamine and vitamin B6.

Brussels sprouts coleslaw recipe

The recipe below is from “Tasting Table Cooking With Friends,” a cookbook written by Geoff Bartakovics, CEO and co-founder of Tasting Table, and Todd Coleman, an award-winning food writer.

This refreshing slaw is made with crunchy, raw Brussels sprouts with a tangy lime-infused dressing. Gut health-boosting white miso paste replaces the usual mayonnaise, sour cream, and sugar of other coleslaw recipes.

Miso is made from cooked soybeans, water, and a fungus called koji. This fungus is used to ferment soybeans. The fermentation process of miso brings out a savory flavor also known as umami.

As miso is fermented, it produces Lactobacillus bacteria, a natural probiotic that can be found in other fermented foods. The probiotics in miso paste also help populate your gut with “good” bacteria, promote digestive health, and strengthen your immune system. (Related: Miso: Add this traditional Japanese condiment to your diet for optimal health.)

The recipe also contains watercress, which offers anti-aging benefits, and ginger, an ingredient that helps balance your blood sugar.

This recipe for a lighter, unique take on coleslaw makes four servings.

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups (¾ pound) Brussels sprouts, trimmed and thinly sliced lengthwise on a mandoline
  • 3 tablespoons (tbsp) olive oil
  • 3 tbsp toasted peanuts, chopped
  • 2 tbsp white miso paste
  • 2 tbsp rice vinegar
  • 1 tbsp fresh lime juice
  • 2 teaspoons (tsp) grated fresh ginger
  • 2 tsp sesame oil
  • 1½ tsp honey
  • Zest of ½ lime
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 bunch watercress (4 oz), ends trimmed

Steps: 

  1. Combine the ginger, honey, lime juice and zest, miso, 2 tablespoons of olive oil, 1 tablespoon of rice vinegar, and sesame oil in a large bowl. Whisk the ingredients until smooth, then season to taste with salt and pepper.
  2. Add the Brussels sprouts and toss to combine. Let the coleslaw sit in the refrigerator for about 30 minutes or up to 4 hours.
  3. Whisk the remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil and 1 tablespoon of rice vinegar in a small bowl to make the vinaigrette, then season with salt and pepper.
  4. Place the watercress on a serving platter and drizzle with the vinaigrette. Season with salt and pepper.
  5. Use your hands to gently toss the ingredients together, then top with the Brussels sprouts and peanuts before serving.

Maintain your gut health by following a balanced diet and eating delicious superfoods like Brussels sprouts and white miso paste.

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